White Horse Tavern

White Horse Tavern

Not to be confused with the Whitehorse in Bridge Street; the wood-fronted White Horse Tavern in the West Village really is the last of a kind. Known to locals as the former haunt of Bob Dylan, the Tavern has the old-world appeal of a wild west bar. The wooden theme continues throughout with ornately carved ceilings, the odd grandfather clock and an intricately worked bar, coupled with a plenitude of old framed prints. The bar dates back to the late 1800’s, and is probably one of the most casual of the “old bars” in New York. The crowd is a healthy …continue reading

Pete's Tavern

Pete's Tavern

Occupying a conspicuous corner spot near Gramercy Park, Pete’s Tavern is fairly hard to miss. With a history stretching back to 1864, Pete’s remains the only continuously operated bar since that time, and has never been closed. The tavern’s fascinating heritage has been largely helped by one particular regular whom frequented the bar on an almost daily basis. Literary great William Sydney Porter (better known as O.Henry) wrote his 1902 epic “Gift of The Magi” from a coveted booth position overlooking Irving Place. The bar has also featured greatly within several well-known movies and television dramas including: Sex and The City, …continue reading

Bemelman's Bar

Bemelman's Bar

Named in commemoration of commissioned artist Ludvig Bemelman, this elegant piano bar was always going to be the defining legacy of The Carlyle. The 80-year old hotel located on the Upper East Side has been an architectural marvel since it’s opening in 1930, and a residency for world leaders, ambassadors and the elite. Overlooking the spectacular verdant space of Central Park, the hotel affords some of the most beautiful panoramic views over the landscapes, and sets a precedent when it comes to luxury.
Bemelman’s Bar is sumptuously decorated in the art-deco style complete with smoky glass tables, leather upholstering and “leg-up” high …continue reading

Old Town Bar

Old Town Bar

The devastating demise of much-loved Chumley’s in 2007 left many New Yorker’s grief stricken, yet sadly the phoenix never rose from the ashes. Old Town Bar on East 18th is a little younger than Chumley’s by about 30 years, but has survived competitor openings, environmental changes and the sophisticated allure of brand bars for over 110 years. The dimly lit Victorian interior is strangely inviting, and once you get inside, you’ll realize why so many cherish the old-world personality of this literature-lovers haunt. Art deco jostles for recognition alongside 19th century character, while the mahogany and marble of the bar …continue reading

McSorley's Old Ale House

McSorley's Old Ale House

Littered with speakeasy’s and watering holes dating back to the prohibitionist era; New York has character bars aplenty, however you’ll find far fewer “real” ale houses that predate the decade of secretive saloons. As it stands, McSorley’s has barely changed since it’s foundation in 1854 – the floor still covered with a layer of sawdust; dusty American breweriana crammed upon shelves and sepia photographs lining the wood-paneled walls. Even the staff look like they’re a part of the history.
McSorley’s is renowned for being one of few places in New York that only sells two kinds of ale – dark or light. …continue reading